Another View #SFWC – Web Pages Analysis

From Robb Lightfoot's thesis analysis, a look at the SFWC's public presence-web pages. A copyrighted image, 2019, by Robb Lightfoot.

Here’s another look at the San Francisco Writers Conference as seen through a word frequency analysis af all the publicly presented pages on their website, www.sfwriters.org. This includes all pages, contact information and media releases. It has a good deal of information from their recent event, #SFWC19. Notice how the theme of community jumps right out at you. Elsewhere, in my analysis, I spend almost 8 hours transcribing 45 minutes of a panel discussion to get a scripted narrative. I’ll be reviewing that for publication, soon. But I think there is a subtle difference here between what emerges in the “business of them being themselves” and what they say about themselves. Spoiler alert, it all seems to track. Their actions are aligned with their words. 🙂

Also, this aligns well with the earlier image of the presenters. Note: Even though the presenter information is on the web page, I excluded it from this data analysis.

What the #SFWC19 Presenters Said – A Word Frequency Analysis

Image copyright, 2019, Robb Lightfoot – contact [email protected]

Thesis analysis of #SFWC19 presenter's words as seen from their publicly available handouts. Image copyrighted, 2019, by Robb Lightfoot - robb@robblightfoot.com

I’m plugging away with my thesis analysis, and here’s a word-frequency graph drawn from the publicly-available handouts provided by the #SFWC19 presenters. These sort of visual analysis often form the starting point of successive, deep, re-readings of the materials and can reveal trends not apparent in any one document.

But I LOVE THIS CHART! Look at the most prominent themes, drawn from more than 14 breakout periods with 5-8 sessions per. Writing! Community! Content! Change! and even Active! and, of of course, Author!

Kudos the SFWC leadership for their work. This tracks with what they say about themselves, COMMUNITY is the biggest word in my analysis of their narratives, drawn from a 45 minute video explaining what the SFWC is. So, what they say, what others say, and (from my initial results of a survey), it’s what the various attendees and volunteers say.

More to come, but I thought I’d share this. It’s taken me many hours, and more money than I care to admit, to get on top of this data and the specialized software needed to do this sort of analysis. My thanks to all, and in particular to my wife, who has been very supportive of a love of writing and my author-friends that borders on the obsessive. Well, OK, that crosses into obsessive and borders on being totally insane. 🙂

#Humor Bookstore

Thinking Funny is proud to offer the following humor publications:

Print & eBook publications – Just click on the image to go to its Amazon page.

Print

This is not a memoir, it’s a sorta-was, a collection of 25 humorous short stories that date back to the days of the “unsupervised sixties.” Problem Child takes you inside the hyperactive and somewhat Machiavellian mind of Robb Lightfoot, the kid who had his own special reserved seat in the principal’s office. He wasn’t looking for trouble, it just found him. He was president and sole member of Highland Elementary’s short-lived rock-throwing club, a chewing gum connoisseur, and woodshop survivor. Robb’s recollections are part truth and part tall tales. Learn why school is unlike Jeopardy! and why too much knowledge may be hazardous to your health. Some of these tales happened almost exactly as written, others are a combination of pranks, misunderstandings, and mishaps that have been combined. Still others are epic stories that have grown with each telling, and form a part of the Lightfoot’s family lore. A key point in these stories is that usually, Robb is trying to do the right thing and getting it all wrong. His allies are a patient principal, a tolerant mother, and neighbors who have their own quirks. The stories cover Robb’s grade school years, and include a cast of his friends. Just like in the TV Show Dragnet, the names have been changed to protect the innocent. Problem Child is dedicated to the late Principal Tom Lewis, who eventually set up an extra desk in his outer office for Robb to take his time outs, reflect, and read. Author Robb Lightfoot went on to complete his studies and entered education as a profession. He now lives and writes in Northern California, and is a full-time, tenured college teacher. He owes a great deal of his success to the very patient faculty and staff at Highland Elementary in Oildale, California. So there is hope for hyperactive kids! They just need people to believe in them and, with kindness, hold them accountable.

eBook

 

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Robb Lightfoot lives in the country and has been fighting a losing battle against home repairs, misbehaving dogs, and his four children. He hates his minivan, but loves his leftovers. In fact, he’ll eat them after they’ve turned green. He’s an expert on how to avoid lawn care—hint, become a soccer coach—and other important topics, such as the best way to scream when a bat is trapped in your tent. Robb was the first to reveal the connection between the Mayan extinction and their secret fruitcake recipe etched into the background of their famous calendars. These 23 tales, illustrated with appropriate and child-safe images, are offered here for the first time as a collection.

eBook

 

 

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Forty-four humorous stories about country-living in Northern California. Learn how to sink a sailboat, return used merchandise with a straight face and pretend to be a wine snob. Lightfoot’s book is a collection of short, family-friendly humor about living in the country, having brain fade, rebooting a road trip, and trying to make your kids do their homework.

eBook